CHILD LABOUR & OTHER PROBLEMS IN QUARRYING
Quarrying for construction material , minerals or to make gravel is hard and dangerous work, particularly for children. But for many poor youngsters whose families are involved in this activity, there is no other choice. Family earnings from quarrying may be barely sufficient to cover basic needs and money earned by children can be an important part of a household’s income. It may even mean the difference between eating and not eating on a given day.

Work in stone quarries is hazardous labour – children carry loads far too heavy for their body size; they risk accidents from the use of explosives and they are constantly exposed to fine dust that can cause chronic respiratory infections, notably silicosis. They may be injured by flying shards of rock that can cause severe eye injury, develop skin problems resulting from prolonged periods working in intense sun and heat, and suffer dehydration. While the hazards and processes are fairly similar from country to country, the family situations, working conditions, ages and gender of children involved vary according to local traditions, the level of poverty, the regulatory environment or other employment or schooling alternatives.

55% of Indians [550 million people] are below 30 years of age and 70% of Indians [700 million people] are below 35 years of age!
 
Anti-poverty strategy comprises of a wide range of poverty alleviation and employment generation programmes
Projects
Watershed development is not merely a matter of harvesting rainwater. Its success crucially entails working out collective protocols of equitable and sustainable use of surface.
 
Refers to efforts made to reduce energy consumption. Energy conservation can be achieved through increased efficient energy use